Author Archives: Maria Khodorkovsky

  • 5 Wise and Witty Biblical Phrases to Ring in 2017

    Posted on December 31, 2016 by Maria Khodorkovsky in Blog.

    The Western world owes many of its pithiest and most quotable aphorisms to the Judeo-Christian canon.  Both the Old and New Testaments are replete with rich imagery, graceful language, and profound wisdoms. Here are 5 quintessential examples. GOOD SAMARITAN The term “good Samaritan” is used to refer to a charitable or kind-hearted person that offers […]

    Post Tagged with , ,
    Continue Reading...
    Comments Off on 5 Wise and Witty Biblical Phrases to Ring in 2017
  • Accent Reduction Training in the 21st Century

    Posted on December 6, 2016 by Maria Khodorkovsky in Blog.

    The United States has long attracted many of the world’s brightest minds. While our universities and businesses benefit from such a dazzling array of experts, foreign professionals and students often find themselves careening headlong into cultural and linguistic barriers that divide them from their American counterparts. To ease the process for them and the American […]

    Continue Reading...
    Comments Off on Accent Reduction Training in the 21st Century
  • A Brief History of Sign Language Interpretation

    Posted on November 22, 2016 by Maria Khodorkovsky in Uncategorized.

    To pay tribute to the talented interpreters who help deaf and mute individuals communicate, we’d like to give you a brief history of sign language interpretation. While ad hoc versions of sign language have existed throughout the course of human civilization, it was not until the 17th century that the Western world saw a systematic […]

    Continue Reading...
    Comments Off on A Brief History of Sign Language Interpretation
  • The Stories Behind 10 U.S. Cities

    Posted on October 13, 2016 by Maria Khodorkovsky in Blog, Philogelos Jokes.

    Read on to find out the fascinating and unexpected etymologies of 10 U.S. cities. Albuquerque Named for its founder, Francisco Fernandez de la Cueva, Duke of Albuquerque, the original word is derived from the Latin albus, meaning “white”, and quercus, meaning “oak.” Atlanta           Having undergone numerous name-changes – from Terminus […]

    Post Tagged with , , ,
    Continue Reading...
    Comments Off on The Stories Behind 10 U.S. Cities
  • Language Panels Travel the Country

    Posted on October 10, 2016 by Maria Khodorkovsky in Blog, Exhibits.

    As part of its Movable Museum initiative, the NML is pleased to offer a number of exhibits for loan. These educational and interactive pieces have traveled the country. Currently, several language panels, along with original historical Bibles, are on display at Heritage Christian Church in Westerville, Ohio until December 31, 2016. Click on the thumbnails below to view full-size […]

    Post Tagged with ,
    Continue Reading...
    Comments Off on Language Panels Travel the Country
  • The United States of Etymology

    Posted on October 4, 2016 by Maria Khodorkovsky in Blog.

    Photo Credit: citizenswaine Latin, Spanish, French, and a host of Native American languages – the names of the states paint a robust picture of our country’s roots. Here they are, in alphabetical order. Alabama: From the Choctaw language albah amo, meaning “plant-cutters.” Alaska: From the Aleut language alaxsxaq, meaning “mainland.” Arizona: From the Basque arizonak, meaning […]

    Post Tagged with ,
    Continue Reading...
    Comments Off on The United States of Etymology
  • What’s in a Name? 10 Popular First Names and their Origins

    Posted on August 4, 2016 by Maria Khodorkovsky in Blog.

    Behind some of the most popular names is a tapestry of religion, diaspora, combat, and integration.  Take an etymological tour of 10 of the most popular male and female given names in the English language. John: Derived as Juan, Jean, Hans, Ivan, Giovanni, as well as a host of other multicultural variations, this ubiquitous name is […]

    Post Tagged with ,
    Continue Reading...
    Comments Off on What’s in a Name? 10 Popular First Names and their Origins
  • The Etymologies of 10 World Nations

    Posted on June 22, 2016 by Maria Khodorkovsky in Blog.

    Do you know which country is named after the second-highest mountain in Africa? How about the nation renamed in the 20th century to better reflect the people living there? Read on to find out! Algeria: Derived from the country’s capital city of Algiers, this name comes from the Arabic al-Jazair, meaning “the islands.”  This refers to […]

    Post Tagged with
    Continue Reading...
    Comments Off on The Etymologies of 10 World Nations
  • 10 Etymologies from the Animal Kingdom

    Posted on May 10, 2016 by Maria Khodorkovsky in Blog.

    How much do you know about the word origins of our furry, scaly, and winged friends? Read on to learn 10 etymologies from the animal kingdom. Camel: This beast of burden traces its linguistic heritage from the Latin camelus and Greek kamelos.  The word has resonances with the Arabic jamala, which means “to bear” or […]

    Post Tagged with , ,
    Continue Reading...
    Comments Off on 10 Etymologies from the Animal Kingdom
  • The Etymology of Natural Phenomena

    Posted on March 30, 2016 by Maria Khodorkovsky in Blog.

    These meteorological phenomena draw from languages across the world while paying homage to the Proto-Indo-European tree from which so many languages were born. Typhoon: Trailing behind it a multi-ethnic and multilingual history, this word finds resonance in the Greek typon, meaning “whirlwind” and the Persian, Arabic, and Hindi tufan, designating a major cyclone or storm.  […]

    Continue Reading...
    Comments Off on The Etymology of Natural Phenomena